Announcing the Winners of the 42nd Annual National Magazine Awards

Our team is proud to reveal the Canadian creators who won Gold and Silver medals at this year’s National Magazine Awards. The gala was held at the Arcadian Court in Toronto, and was hosted by NMA-winner Omar Mouallem.

MAGAZINE GRAND PRIX

Nouveau Projet took home the prestigious, 2019 Magazine Grand Prix award. A six-time consecutive finalist in this category, Nouveau Projet had also won this coveted title in 2014. The judges cited the magazine’s risk-taking spirit and impressive scope: “Consistently ambitious, Nouveau Projet brings a fresh look and stimulating content to its examination of francophone society. Their team has crafted a great system that allows for clarity and variety, and they masterfully orchestrate all the things that make magazines a pleasure to read.”

BEST MAGAZINE AWARDS

In each of the four Best Magazine Divisions, judges selected one gold winner from the three nominees. The gold winners are:

Best Magazine: News, Business, General Interest

GOLD: Nouveau Projet
HONOURABLE MENTION: The Walrus, Toronto Life

Best Magazine: Special Interest

GOLD: Up Here Magazine
HONOURABLE MENTION: Fete Chinoise, U of T Medicine

Best Magazine: Service & Lifestyle

GOLD: Cottage Life
HONOURABLE MENTION: Elle Canada, FASHION Magazine

Best Magazine: Art, Literary, & Culture

GOLD: Esse arts + opinion
HONOURABLE MENTION: Canadian Art, The Site Magazine

BEST NEW MAGAZINE WRITER

From four talented, promising nominees, Max Binks-Collier was awarded the Best New Magazine Writer title for “Distant Relatives,” published in Maisonneuve. The jury had this to say of Max’s work:

““Distant Relatives” is a suspenseful, in-depth exploration of medical malpractice and the institutional complicity that allowed it to happen. With his thoughtful interviews and extensive historical research, Binks-Collier pulls readers in and keeps them hooked all the way through.”

Honourable Mention went to Jennifer Thornhill Verma (Maisonneuve), Anais Granofsky (Toronto Life), and Mugoli Samba (The United Church Observer).

EDITOR GRAND PRIX

For the second year, the Foundation presented the Editor Grand Prix award to a senior-level editor who demonstrated a high degree of excellence, making an outstanding impact on their magazine. Alison Uncles of Maclean’s was the proud recipient of this year’s award.

PUBLISHER GRAND PRIX

The Publisher Grand Prix award recognizes a publisher whose brand best delivers on their editorial mandate through numerous platforms. From the three nominees—Canadian Geographic, Inuit Art Quarterly, and Toronto Life—Ken Hunt publisher of Toronto Life received gold. In their discussion, the jury put it thusly:  if you live in Toronto, you know Toronto Life, and as Toronto is growing, Toronto Life is growing with it.

FOUNDATION AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT

Linda Spalding—an acclaimed writer and a longtime editor of the literary journal Brick—was presented with the 2019 Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement. At the gala, she was introduced by Laurie D. Graham, who remarked that “Linda provides a model of how to do this publishing work with emotion as well as intellect. She sprouted in Brick the seriousness and irreverence that has come to be the magazine’s guiding ethos.”

Top-winning magazines include:

Magazines winning one Gold Medal include: Air Canada enRoute, BESIDE, esse arts + opinions, LSTW, Prairie Fire, Québec Science, Ryerson University Magazine, Sharp, Taddle Creek, Title Magazine, and Up Here Magazine.

Magazines winning one Silver Medal include: Geist, Report on Business Magazine, The Malahat Review, The Maritime Edit, The Site Magazine, Toronto Life Stylebook, and University of Toronto Magazine.

Highlights of the 42nd annual NMAs

Mathieu Lachapelle of Dînette Magazine captured three awards for his photography work, winning Silver for Portrait Photography and winning both Gold and Silver in Lifestyle Photography.

Anthony Oliveira is a 2019 two-time Gold winner in Long Form Feature Writing and Essay, for his piece “Death in the Village” published in Hazlitt.

The Walrus swept the Illustration (including spot and photo illustration) category: “The End of an Empire” by Sébastien Thibault won silver, while “Bad Code” by Cristian Fowlie took Gold.


Writing & Visual Awards

In the 17 creator-focused categories, Gold winners received a $1000 cash prize. The gold and silver medalists are:

Long-Form Feature Writing

GOLD: Anthony Oliveira, “Death in the Village,” Hazlitt
GOLD: Brett Popplewell, “Final Edition,” The Walrus

Feature Writing

GOLD: Omar Mouallem, “It’s the End of the World as We Know It,” Title Magazine
SILVER: Emily Landau, “I, Tanya,” Toronto Life Stylebook

Short Feature Writing

GOLD: Christopher DiRaddo, “Austin or Bust,” Air Canada enRoute SILVER: Matt Williams, “Jeremy Dutcher’s Gift for His People,” The Maritime Edit

Columns

GOLD: Kamal Al-Solaylee, “Points of Departure,” Sharp
SILVER: Lisa Bird-Wilson, “Clowns, Cakes, Canoes: This is Canada?” Geist  

Essays

GOLD: Anthony Oliveira, “Death in the Village,” Hazlitt
SILVER: Larissa Diakiw, “Secrets Are a Captive Country,” Hazlitt

Investigative Reporting

GOLD: Alison Motluk, “Hallway Health Care,” Toronto Life  
SILVER: Martin Patriquin, “Warning Signs,” The Walrus

Fiction

GOLD: RJ Edwards, “Loose Time,” Taddle Creek
SILVER: Christine Higdon, “A Prayer for Ursula in Open D,” The Malahat Review

Lifestyle Photography

GOLD: Mathieu Lachapelle, “La brume de l’Oregon,” Dînette magazine
SILVER: Mathieu Lachapelle, “Au cœur des nuages,” Dînette magazine

Personal Journalism

GOLD: Gwen Benaway, “A Body Like a Home,” Hazlitt  
SILVER: Meaghan Rondeau, “Half-Thing,” The New Quarterly

Poetry

GOLD: Ben Ladouceur, “The Green Carnation,” Prairie Fire  
SILVER: Terence Young, “The Bear,” The New Quarterly

Profiles

GOLD: Katrina Onstad, “Mr. Robot,” Toronto Life
SILVER: Malcolm Johnston, “Born to Run,” Toronto Life  

Service Journalism

GOLD: Mélissa Guillemette, “Où vont les déchets électroniques ?,” Québec Science
SILVER: Mark Pupo, “Where to Eat 2018,” Toronto Life  

Illustration (including Spot & Photo Illustration)

GOLD: Cristian Fowlie, “Bad Code,” The Walrus
SILVER: Sébastien Thibault, “The End of an Empire,” The Walrus  

Portrait Photography

GOLD: Grant Harder, “Tremors,” Maisonneuve
SILVER: Mathieu Lachapelle, “Dompter le roc,” Dînette magazine

Photo Essay & Photojournalism

GOLD: Kamil Bialous, “That Which Does Not Burn,” Cottage Life SILVER: Stephen J. Thorne, “Citizens of War,” Legion Magazine

One of a Kind Storytelling

GOLD: Michael Friscolanti, Jason Markusoff, and Kyle Edwards, “ ‘It was the last time we saw him:’ An oral history of the Humboldt Broncos bus crash,” Maclean’s
SILVER: Martin Patenaude-Monette (Martin PM), “Le bonheur en transition,” Nouveau Projet

Editorial Awards

Art Direction of a Single Article

GOLD: Studio Wyse, Keeping Memories Alive,” Ryerson University Magazine
SILVER: Carey van der Zalm,“Body, Space & Object,” The Site Magazine  

Best Editorial Package

GOLD: WWI Commemorative Issue,” Maclean’s
SILVER: “Autumn 2018: The Cities We Need,” University of Toronto Magazine

Art Direction Grand Prix

GOLD: Eliane Cadieux,Issue 05: What does our future with nature hold? | Numéro 05 : Quel avenir sommes-nous en train de bâtir ?” BESIDE
SILVER: Jean-François Proulx, Balistique, “Nouveau Projet 13,” Nouveau Projet

Editor Grand Prix

GOLD: Alison Uncles, Maclean’s

Cover Grand Prix

GOLD: “Pay equity,” Maclean’s
SILVER: “Blood in the Air,” Report on Business

Issue Grand Prix

GOLD: lstw issue #3, lstw
SILVER: Nouveau Projet 14, Nouveau Projet

Publisher Grand Prix

GOLD: Ken Hunt, Toronto Life


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The NMAF gratefully acknowledges the support of the Government of Canada, the Ontario Arts Council,  Ontario Creates, Reader’s Digest Foundation, and KCK Global. We are also thankful for the support of CCR Solutions, Cision, Magazines Canada, PUSH Media, RedPoint Media & Marketing Solutions, TC Transcontinental Printing, The Arcadian Court, University of Alberta, Very Good Studios, and Vividata.

We also owe a huge thank you to this year’s judges, who volunteered their time and expertise, evaluating the hundreds of entries submitted to this year’s competition.

Congratulations to all of the winners of the 42nd annual National Magazine awards! Follow us on Twitter and visit our Facebook page for updates on next year’s call for entries.

Off the Page: Julian Brave NoiseCat

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Julian Brave NoiseCat. Photo: Xidi Ma.

Off the Page is a regular interview series featuring National Magazine Award winners and finalists. We recently spoke with writer Julian Brave NoiseCat, finalist for the NMA 2018 Best New Magazine Writer for his feature “The Tribal Canoe Journey.

A recipient of the 2017 CJF-CBC Indigenous Journalism Fellowship, Julian is a correspondent at Real America with Jorge Ramos, contributing editor for Canadian Geographic and a freelance writer. His work has appeared in The Guardian, The Nation, The Paris Review and many other publications. He is a proud member of the Canim Lake Band Tsq’escen and a descendant of the Lil’Wat Nation of Mount Currie.

Your article on the Tribal Canoe Journey mentions traditional oral histories. You make an interesting comment of how calling these stories legends or fables “infantilizes” them. Do you think this undermines the culture?

The direct answer is I think that it can. Words matter, and the language we use to describe them affects the way we think about them. I’d like to view all sorts of stories, whether they be more traditional origin stories or masterful multi-volume novels, as all part of an interrelated practice of storytelling.

How important do you consider these traditional stories to Indigenous culture, in terms of understanding the culture and continuing it?

I think they’re obviously important, but so are new writers and novels. For example, Tommy Orange’s book There There. They’re all very important.

The story of the first symbolic canoe expo, coming out of a centennial celebration, and your description of it as “Thanksgiving in reverse” was also interesting. Canada recently celebrated its 150th anniversary, and there was much discussion in the Indigenous community about what that meant in their history. Do you think these moments in time, where there is a heightened lens on Indigenous issues,  could be turned around to an advantage, like the examples in your article?

Yes. I think there’s a way of seeing these events as somewhat one-sided, but I think it’s often more complicated than that. If we look back at Canada 150, Canada’s celebration of its 150 years was, in comparison to other centennial celebrations in Canada, quite cautious and tepid. At the same time, Indigenous protests of and counter-narrative to Canada 150 was really powerful.

I do think that is ultimately what can happen, especially when we have such a strong Indigenous movement like we do today.

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Photo: Julian Brave NoiseCat

Your article “The Rhodes scholarship wasn’t designed for my people — that’s why I had to win,” really captured the kind of conversations Indigenous men and women experience all the time. Questions about taxes, land-ownership, and typical family structures tend to take focus when someone finds out you’re Native.

How have you learned to respond to? Your article features some inner monologue about how you would have liked to respond, but didn’t. Have these gotten any closer with experience?

I would say that it’s always sort of a process, knowing that is the climate and structure we are up against, but also becoming increasingly confident and comfortable in our own skin. And believing that despite forces aligned against us, we can come into these spaces and succeed. In the world of journalism, we can show up at newspapers and magazines, and write stuff just as good or maybe even better than our peers. We can go into the halls of power and political situations, into jobs and corporations, and do a kick ass job.

In that one instance, it was quite a challenging experience for me, even when I reflect back on it. But ultimately it also did prepare me for the next interview where that happens, the next situation where my race leads people to challenge me, question me, or undermine me in particular ways.

What was it like interviewing Connie Walker, who’s such a prominent Indigenous journalist, as a young Indigenous journalist yourself?

I think what’s really cool about journalism is that you get to talk to all these awesome people. Connie Walker was an awesome person to talk to, but there’s also been many other cool Native and non-Native people I’ve had the opportunity to talk to. That’s what I find really cool about journalism. That opportunity not only just to write the story, but to talk to people who are experts, who have lived the experience you are trying to relate to your readers.

In your interview, she mentions how she is almost now exclusively reporting on Indigenous issues, where ten years ago there was little to no interest. Do you agree it’s an opportune time for young Indigenous writers to have their voices heard?

Absolutely. [In that interview] we talked a lot about digital technology. There’s a lot more opportunity for entry. There’s more blogs, there’s new publications starting up all the time. There’s a lot of writers who get their start on Facebook and Twitter. For Indigenous writers, a community who has something to say and add to the conversation, that technology shift is a big opportunity to us.

On the flip side though, I worry sometimes that there is going to be, as Harold Cardinal [Cree writer and political leader] wrote about in the 60s and 70s, a “buckskin curtain”. That we will be confined to reservations of not just literal geography, but also of political discourse, of journalism, of career opportunities. That we will be constantly cast as Indigenous people who only talk about Indigenous issues.

And to me, on a continent that has taken so much from First Nations, everything is in some way an Indigenous issue. And Indigenous people should have a say on all of the issues of the day, whether that be the rights of our community, or questions of economic equality, justice or immigration. We clearly have something to say about all of these things.

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Photo: Julian Brave NoiseCat

Do you think Indigenous people have a certain responsibility to their culture? To learn it, and continue it. In a way that other cultures may not with the same urgency? And how would you suggest going about this? You’re an accomplished writer and activist, but how can anyone become involved?

I think all cultures have a lot to offer. I think culture is just fundamentally cool, and I don’t think that it is exclusively an Indigenous thing. Obviously, we have a particular history of our culture being under attack. So I think that creates a certain imperative to maintain, strengthen and carry forward our culture, but I think those cultures are constantly changing.

Our culture is not exclusively the traditions of our grandparents, or the generations before them. They’re also the things that Native youth are today with in Winnipeg with hip-hop, Native actors and directors are doing today in Vancouver, or any of the things our fantastic writers are doing with the written word. I think that it’s all of those things.

What are some of your next projects, or goals for the near future?

I have conversations constantly with different publications about articles that I’m writing. I recently got back from Paris where I spoke at the Festival America, which is a North American-focused literature festival. I’m writing a couple of pieces about that, about the history of Indigenous travellers in Paris, and Indigenous artists and writers passing through there today. Playing with the question of “What is Indigenous Paris”? And in the longer term, I’d love to write a book. I’ve been getting queries from publishers and agents, and I’m in the early stages of figuring out what that book would be about.


Julian Brave NoiseCat is a correspondent at Real America with Jorge Ramos, contributing editor for Canadian Geographic, and freelance writer whose work has appeared in The Guardian, The Nation, The Paris Review, and many other publications. He was a finalist for a National Magazine Award, Best New Magazine Writer in 2018. A proud member of the Canim Lake Band Tsq’escen and descendant of the Lil’Wat Nation of Mount Currie, he resides in Washington, D.C.

Interview conducted by Tobey VanWeston.

Submissions for the 42nd National Magazine Awards are now being accepted! Magazines and creators are invited to submit their best work of 2018 in 29 categories, including the prestigious Best New Magazine Writer category. The final submissions deadline is January 18, 2019. Click here to begin the submissions process.