News

Early-Bird Deadline for the National Magazine Awards

9.png

Thinking of submitting an entry to the 2019 National Magazine Awards? Act quick! Though the call for entries will remain open until January 18th, the early-bird rate comes to an end on Monday, January 14th.

Submitting an entry is easy; download our quick reference guide (this has all the info on categories, eligibility, and more) and follow these six steps:

  1. Review the Categories, Rules, FAQ
  2. Register online at submissions.magazine-awards.com
  3. Enter the details of each submission
  4. Upload a PDF of each submission
  5. Pay the required entry fees 
  6. Courier hard copies (if required)

Freelancers, don’t forget that the support fund offers a discounted entry rate of $50.00 per submission. After the early bird deadline, this rate jumps to $62.50.

Small magazines, take note that our rebate is offered on a first come, first served basis. Get your entries in now to secure a free second entry (offered to magazines whose annual revenue is $200,000 or less).

Got questions? Shoot us an email at staff@magazine-awards.com, and we’ll get you answers. You can call us, too, at 416-939-6200. 

If you’re looking for digital categories, head on over to digitalpublishingawards.ca. The DPAs are accepting entries until January 31, 2019. B2B mags, you’ll be happy to hear that we’ve launched a new program, the National Magazine Awards: B2B. The deadline for submitting entries to that program is February 1, 2019.

Off the Page: Julian Brave NoiseCat

OtP
Julian Brave NoiseCat. Photo: Xidi Ma.

Off the Page is a regular interview series featuring National Magazine Award winners and finalists. We recently spoke with writer Julian Brave NoiseCat, finalist for the NMA 2018 Best New Magazine Writer for his feature “The Tribal Canoe Journey.

A recipient of the 2017 CJF-CBC Indigenous Journalism Fellowship, Julian is a correspondent at Real America with Jorge Ramos, contributing editor for Canadian Geographic and a freelance writer. His work has appeared in The Guardian, The Nation, The Paris Review and many other publications. He is a proud member of the Canim Lake Band Tsq’escen and a descendant of the Lil’Wat Nation of Mount Currie.

Your article on the Tribal Canoe Journey mentions traditional oral histories. You make an interesting comment of how calling these stories legends or fables “infantilizes” them. Do you think this undermines the culture?

The direct answer is I think that it can. Words matter, and the language we use to describe them affects the way we think about them. I’d like to view all sorts of stories, whether they be more traditional origin stories or masterful multi-volume novels, as all part of an interrelated practice of storytelling.

How important do you consider these traditional stories to Indigenous culture, in terms of understanding the culture and continuing it?

I think they’re obviously important, but so are new writers and novels. For example, Tommy Orange’s book There There. They’re all very important.

The story of the first symbolic canoe expo, coming out of a centennial celebration, and your description of it as “Thanksgiving in reverse” was also interesting. Canada recently celebrated its 150th anniversary, and there was much discussion in the Indigenous community about what that meant in their history. Do you think these moments in time, where there is a heightened lens on Indigenous issues,  could be turned around to an advantage, like the examples in your article?

Yes. I think there’s a way of seeing these events as somewhat one-sided, but I think it’s often more complicated than that. If we look back at Canada 150, Canada’s celebration of its 150 years was, in comparison to other centennial celebrations in Canada, quite cautious and tepid. At the same time, Indigenous protests of and counter-narrative to Canada 150 was really powerful.

I do think that is ultimately what can happen, especially when we have such a strong Indigenous movement like we do today.

julian2
Photo: Julian Brave NoiseCat

Your article “The Rhodes scholarship wasn’t designed for my people — that’s why I had to win,” really captured the kind of conversations Indigenous men and women experience all the time. Questions about taxes, land-ownership, and typical family structures tend to take focus when someone finds out you’re Native.

How have you learned to respond to? Your article features some inner monologue about how you would have liked to respond, but didn’t. Have these gotten any closer with experience?

I would say that it’s always sort of a process, knowing that is the climate and structure we are up against, but also becoming increasingly confident and comfortable in our own skin. And believing that despite forces aligned against us, we can come into these spaces and succeed. In the world of journalism, we can show up at newspapers and magazines, and write stuff just as good or maybe even better than our peers. We can go into the halls of power and political situations, into jobs and corporations, and do a kick ass job.

In that one instance, it was quite a challenging experience for me, even when I reflect back on it. But ultimately it also did prepare me for the next interview where that happens, the next situation where my race leads people to challenge me, question me, or undermine me in particular ways.

What was it like interviewing Connie Walker, who’s such a prominent Indigenous journalist, as a young Indigenous journalist yourself?

I think what’s really cool about journalism is that you get to talk to all these awesome people. Connie Walker was an awesome person to talk to, but there’s also been many other cool Native and non-Native people I’ve had the opportunity to talk to. That’s what I find really cool about journalism. That opportunity not only just to write the story, but to talk to people who are experts, who have lived the experience you are trying to relate to your readers.

In your interview, she mentions how she is almost now exclusively reporting on Indigenous issues, where ten years ago there was little to no interest. Do you agree it’s an opportune time for young Indigenous writers to have their voices heard?

Absolutely. [In that interview] we talked a lot about digital technology. There’s a lot more opportunity for entry. There’s more blogs, there’s new publications starting up all the time. There’s a lot of writers who get their start on Facebook and Twitter. For Indigenous writers, a community who has something to say and add to the conversation, that technology shift is a big opportunity to us.

On the flip side though, I worry sometimes that there is going to be, as Harold Cardinal [Cree writer and political leader] wrote about in the 60s and 70s, a “buckskin curtain”. That we will be confined to reservations of not just literal geography, but also of political discourse, of journalism, of career opportunities. That we will be constantly cast as Indigenous people who only talk about Indigenous issues.

And to me, on a continent that has taken so much from First Nations, everything is in some way an Indigenous issue. And Indigenous people should have a say on all of the issues of the day, whether that be the rights of our community, or questions of economic equality, justice or immigration. We clearly have something to say about all of these things.

julian1
Photo: Julian Brave NoiseCat

Do you think Indigenous people have a certain responsibility to their culture? To learn it, and continue it. In a way that other cultures may not with the same urgency? And how would you suggest going about this? You’re an accomplished writer and activist, but how can anyone become involved?

I think all cultures have a lot to offer. I think culture is just fundamentally cool, and I don’t think that it is exclusively an Indigenous thing. Obviously, we have a particular history of our culture being under attack. So I think that creates a certain imperative to maintain, strengthen and carry forward our culture, but I think those cultures are constantly changing.

Our culture is not exclusively the traditions of our grandparents, or the generations before them. They’re also the things that Native youth are today with in Winnipeg with hip-hop, Native actors and directors are doing today in Vancouver, or any of the things our fantastic writers are doing with the written word. I think that it’s all of those things.

What are some of your next projects, or goals for the near future?

I have conversations constantly with different publications about articles that I’m writing. I recently got back from Paris where I spoke at the Festival America, which is a North American-focused literature festival. I’m writing a couple of pieces about that, about the history of Indigenous travellers in Paris, and Indigenous artists and writers passing through there today. Playing with the question of “What is Indigenous Paris”? And in the longer term, I’d love to write a book. I’ve been getting queries from publishers and agents, and I’m in the early stages of figuring out what that book would be about.


Julian Brave NoiseCat is a correspondent at Real America with Jorge Ramos, contributing editor for Canadian Geographic, and freelance writer whose work has appeared in The Guardian, The Nation, The Paris Review, and many other publications. He was a finalist for a National Magazine Award, Best New Magazine Writer in 2018. A proud member of the Canim Lake Band Tsq’escen and descendant of the Lil’Wat Nation of Mount Currie, he resides in Washington, D.C.

Interview conducted by Tobey VanWeston.

Submissions for the 42nd National Magazine Awards are now being accepted! Magazines and creators are invited to submit their best work of 2018 in 29 categories, including the prestigious Best New Magazine Writer category. The final submissions deadline is January 18, 2019. Click here to begin the submissions process.

Happy Holidays from the National Magazine Awards

Copy of NMA TEMPLATES (1).png

From everyone at the National Media Awards Foundation, have a warm, happy, and healthy holiday season. Though our office will be closed on December 25th, December 26th, and January 1st, entries may be submitted any time during the holidays via our online submissions portal. The early-bird deadline is January 11, 2019, and the final online submissions deadline is January 18, 2019. May the new year greet you with many great stories waiting to be read, and may your favourite magazine bring you some extra joy this season!


Follow us on Twitter @MagAwards
Like our Facebook page
Subscribe to our newsletter

Contact us at staff@magazine-awards.com 

 

Freelancers: Save 50% on Registration Fees

FSF_EN_TwitterCard

Our popular Freelancer Support Fund is returning for the 2019 awards season! The fund is open to Canadian freelance writers, photographers, and illustrators who enter their own work for consideration. Freelancers can submit their first two entries at the discounted rate of $50 per submission, or 50% off the regular rate.

Who’s Eligible?

Freelancers who are not staff members of a publication whose work they are submitting, and whose byline appears on the work they are submitting.

How do I Apply?

Once you’ve submitting your entries and are ready to pay, select the “Freelancer Support Fund” option. We’ll email you an invoice that reflects the discounted entry fee. That’s it!

Here’s even more info on the fund. Remember to get your submission in by the early bird deadline of January 11, 2019. After that, the freelancer rate offered is $62.50.

The final deadline for submissions is January 18, 2019.

Click here to begin the submission process.

Small Magazines: Apply for the NMA’s Rebate and Get Your Second Entry Free!

smallmagrebate_nma.png

The NMAs strive to ensure that the awards recognize the best work from Canadian magazines, inclusive of diverse small and cultural magazines. The Small Magazine Rebate helps to ensure this broad base of participation. And so, we’re thrilled to offer the second entry free to the eligible magazines whose annual revenue is $200,000 or less*.

Who’s Eligible?

Here’s all of the information on eligibility for the rebate. Namely, the annual revenue must include all operating revenue as well as grants, subsidies, and funding; and, the rebate applies to magazine submitters only (not to individual, freelance submitters). 

How do I Apply?

Simply submit your entries to the NMAs here. When you get to the payment stage, select the “Small Magazine option. If your magazine meets the eligibility requirements, you’ll receive an invoice by email that reflects the free entry.

Why should I take advantage of the Small Magazine Rebate?

    • New Readers: Award-winning magazines attract new readers who are hungry for great stories.
    • Bragging Rights: Tell your readers and supporters that you are delivering the best and most credible content, recognized by your peers in the magazine industry.
    • Get Noticed: With a National Magazine Award, writers and artists find new audiences for their creative work.
    • Celebrate Your Creators: Editors, publishers and art directors have the opportunity to reward creative talent.
  • We Promote You: The NMAF works year-round to promote award-winning magazines and creators through mass media publicity, social media channels, special promotions, and more.

Click here to begin the submission process.

For full details on the rebate, click here. Contact us at staff@magazine-awards.com if you have questions on the status of your application, and remember that the final submissions deadline is January 18, 2019.

*Please note that the rebate operates on a “first come, first served” basis; apply early to ensure your magazine gets their free entry!