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Happy Holidays from the National Magazine Awards

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From everyone at the National Media Awards Foundation, have a warm, happy, and healthy holiday season. Though our office will be closed on December 25th, December 26th, and January 1st, entries may be submitted any time during the holidays via our online submissions portal. The early-bird deadline is January 11, 2019, and the final online submissions deadline is January 18, 2019. May the new year greet you with many great stories waiting to be read, and may your favourite magazine bring you some extra joy this season!


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Contact us at staff@magazine-awards.com 

 

Freelancers: Save 50% on Registration Fees

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Our popular Freelancer Support Fund is returning for the 2019 awards season! The fund is open to Canadian freelance writers, photographers, and illustrators who enter their own work for consideration. Freelancers can submit their first two entries at the discounted rate of $50 per submission, or 50% off the regular rate.

Who’s Eligible?

Freelancers who are not staff members of a publication whose work they are submitting, and whose byline appears on the work they are submitting.

How do I Apply?

Once you’ve submitting your entries and are ready to pay, select the “Freelancer Support Fund” option. We’ll email you an invoice that reflects the discounted entry fee. That’s it!

Here’s even more info on the fund. Remember to get your submission in by the early bird deadline of January 11, 2019. After that, the freelancer rate offered is $62.50.

The final deadline for submissions is January 18, 2019.

Click here to begin the submission process.

Small Magazines: Apply for the NMA’s Rebate and Get Your Second Entry Free!

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The NMAs strive to ensure that the awards recognize the best work from Canadian magazines, inclusive of diverse small and cultural magazines. The Small Magazine Rebate helps to ensure this broad base of participation. And so, we’re thrilled to offer the second entry free to the eligible magazines whose annual revenue is $200,000 or less*.

Who’s Eligible?

Here’s all of the information on eligibility for the rebate. Namely, the annual revenue must include all operating revenue as well as grants, subsidies, and funding; and, the rebate applies to magazine submitters only (not to individual, freelance submitters). 

How do I Apply?

Simply submit your entries to the NMAs here. When you get to the payment stage, select the “Small Magazine option. If your magazine meets the eligibility requirements, you’ll receive an invoice by email that reflects the free entry.

Why should I take advantage of the Small Magazine Rebate?

    • New Readers: Award-winning magazines attract new readers who are hungry for great stories.
    • Bragging Rights: Tell your readers and supporters that you are delivering the best and most credible content, recognized by your peers in the magazine industry.
    • Get Noticed: With a National Magazine Award, writers and artists find new audiences for their creative work.
    • Celebrate Your Creators: Editors, publishers and art directors have the opportunity to reward creative talent.
  • We Promote You: The NMAF works year-round to promote award-winning magazines and creators through mass media publicity, social media channels, special promotions, and more.

Click here to begin the submission process.

For full details on the rebate, click here. Contact us at staff@magazine-awards.com if you have questions on the status of your application, and remember that the final submissions deadline is January 18, 2019.

*Please note that the rebate operates on a “first come, first served” basis; apply early to ensure your magazine gets their free entry!

Call for Entries: 42nd Call for Entries

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We are now accepting submissions for the 42nd annual National Magazine Awards. The competition is open to Canadian creators and magazines, for awards in 29 Written & Visual, Editorial, Best magazine, and Special categories. Gold winners in Written & Visual categories receive a $1000 cash prize. Digital content is eligible in most categories.

January 18, 2019 is the final deadline for entries. Take advantage of the early-bird rate and enter by January 11, 2019!

Freelancer Support Fund

Back by popular demand, the Freelancer Support Fund allows freelance creators to submit their first two entries at the discounted rate of $50 per submission, or 50% of the regular rate if entries are submitted after the early-bird deadline.

Small Magazine Rebate

If your magazines’ annual revenue is $200,000 or less, you’re likely eligible for the Small Magazine Rebate. This rebate is equal to one free entry.

How to Submit

  1. Review the Categories and Rules
  2. Register online at submissions.magazine-awards.com 
  3. Enter the details of each submission
  4. Upload a PDF of each submission and a JPG of the front page
  5. Pay the required entry fees ($100 for most entries)
  6. Courier hard copies (if required)

Deadlines

January 14: NMA Early Bird Deadline
January 18: NMA Final Deadline

Digital Publishing Awards

The 2019 Digital Publishing Awards will feature 23 awards recognizing and rewarding Canadian digital publications and creators. Creators’ awards come with a $500 cash prize. Submissions for the 4th annual DPAs will open on January 2, 2019.

National Magazine Awards: B2B

In addition to submitting for the NMA category of Professional Article, B2B journalists and publications are invited to enter the inaugural National Magazine Awards: B2B. Awards in 19 categories will recognize the work of business-to-business creators and editorial teams, with $500 cash prizes for Gold winners in creator-focused categories. Submissions open on January 3, 2019.

Gala

The details of the 42nd National Magazine Awards gala will be announced this spring. Follow us on at @MagAwards for the most up-to-date news.

Ready to Submit?

Click here to get started.

 

Off the Page: Lauren Tamaki

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Off the Page is a regular interview series featuring National Magazine Award winners. In this interview, we catch up with Lauren Tamaki. Lauren is a Canadian illustrator who currently resides in Brooklyn, New York. At the 41st annual NMAs, Lauren won Gold in the category of Illustration, for “Get the Scissors,” published in The Walrus. Read on to learn more about her creative process, use of acrylic ink, and future projects.

tamaki1.pngThe visuals you created for this comedic piece balanced perfectly with a harsh reality for women everywhere. You bridge the gap so seamlessly between the text and visual and you and Scaachi perfectly complement each other to appreciate humour all the while documenting hardship. The story challenges cultural codes and conventions of femininity—did you consider the social undertone a privilege or a responsibility to represent in your work, and what were the most important story arcs in Scaachi’s editorial that shaped your work?

When illustrating an article, I feel responsibility to the author! Because Scaachi’s book (the piece was an excerpt from her book One Day We’ll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter) is about the experience of a woman of colour and women’s bodies, it’s inherently political. The STRUGGLE was what I wanted to communicate in the illustration; you feel the desperation mount as the story progresses!

The projects featured in your online portfolio experiment with a lot of watercolour. Do you like to be variant with your use of media choice and do you strategically chose particular media for each project you do?

Everything you think is watercolour on my site is actually coloured acrylic ink. I think choice of medium and the application of that medium plays a big part of a final piece—black ink can be swooshy and fun or very precise, for example. I chose to go with frantic pencil vibes for Scaachi’s story because it suited the mood perfectly (tornadoes of scribbled hair, etc).

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On your website, you have completed illustrations under the subject ‘Runway’ in your Fashion and Beauty category. In comparing these two projects from the ‘model’ to dealing with body image and identity, how did you shift gears into “Get The Scissors” to offer a distressing dressing room experience instead of a glamourous one?

It’s a joy and a responsibility to depict women of all shapes and sizes. It’s not a hard mental shift for me to go from fashion to something more realistic. The story did not call for a glamourous vibe—it details something SO many of us have gone through, so I wanted it to be grounded. Even though Scaachi is a pretty glamorous woman, she keeps it real, as the kids (used to) say.

In 2017, you sketched the Bill Cosby Trial for The New York Times. In 2009 you graduated in Fashion Design and in 2011, you went on to graduate with a second Bachelor of Arts in Design. What initiated the transition from fashion and design into editorial art?

I always knew I wanted to be an illustrator… my fashion design degree was a way of putting it off, to be perfectly honest. I worked in the fashion industry only eight months before I went back to school for Visual Communications at ACAD, which was the best decision of my life! All I’ve ever wanted to do is draw.

In the future, in what area and for which platform to do you want the focus of your work to be in?

More fashion please! I know I’ve been downplaying the whole fashion thing, but I do really really love it. I was never meant to make clothes, but I sure do love drawing the visions of fabulous designers. I’ve also always wanted to do a series for an opera (COC, looking at you) or a series for a theatre season!

 

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You have worked with an extensive list of clients and your ‘bragging’ section online is an archive of recent awards, including your NMA award. What does your Gold Illustration Award mean to you as an artist?

It was quite a surprise! The Walrus submitted the illustration, which meant I forgot about it, so when I got the email about the nomination, I was like… neat!!! When I walked into the awards show and saw the scale, the time and care that had been put into every aspect, then I started to get nervous! Winning the gold was very unexpected. The Scaachi illustration was simple and the other nominees had really involved, detailed pieces! I was blown away. The fact I made an illustration in a style I care about won something? Incredible.

Which Canadian publication is on your radar to work with next?

I would love to illustrate more books and there is no shortage of incredible publishers in Canada—Tundra, Drawn & Quarterly… In terms of magazines, there are so so many beautiful Canadian publications… and they all should call me! Haha! Also, 48 North just released a stunning magazine called Latitude that I’d love to work on.


In addition to her National Magazine Award, Lauren has been recognized by the Society of Illustrators, Society of News Design, and American Illustration. Her most recent project involved illustrating Caroline Paul’s book, You Are Mighty: A Guide to Changing the World (Bloomsbury, May 2018). You can read more about Lauren’s work here.

Interview conducted by Bethany Browne.

The call for entries for the 2019 National Magazine Awards opens on December 17, 2018. Click here for more information on submissions.