Joyce Byrne to Receive the 2018 Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement

OAEnglish
The National Media Awards Foundation (NMAF) is proud to present the 2018 Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement to Joyce Byrne, publisher of Avenue Calgary at RedPoint Media & Marketing Solutions.
If you are passionate about Canadian publishing, you have met or worked with Joyce. Described as a “champion of magazines,” Joyce has an all-in approach to her work that makes her stand out.

“Joyce doesn’t look for easy,” notes Penny Caldwell, former editor and publisher of Cottage Life. “Since bursting onto the magazine publishing scene, she has consistently reached beyond her own sphere to help others.”

Just before launching her career in the early 2000s, Joyce took a publishing course with D. B. Scott at Ryerson University. There, she met Anicka Quin, who is now editorial director of Western Living and Vancouver magazines. Quin recalls the meeting: “[Joyce] was there with her wicked sense of humour, and she quickly stood out as one of the only ones there who was really ready to be a part of this industry.”
And ready, she was. During her tenure as publisher of This Magazine, from 2001 to 2005, the publication excelled on the business and editorial side.

This Magazine has only been nominated once in its 52-year history for Magazine of the Year at the National Magazine Awards and it was during Joyce’s time as publisher, a testament to her leadership and the excellent magazine it produced,” notes Lisa Whittington-Hill, Joyce’s successor and current publisher of This.

In 2005, Joyce left This Magazine in the capable hands of Whittington-Hill and moved to Edmonton, joining award-winning Venture Publishing as vice-president and associate publisher. There, she focused her work on Alberta Venture and unlimited magazines. In 2008, unlimited became the first Alberta-based magazine to win a National Magazine Award for Art Direction of an Entire Issue, a remarkable achievement for the team of the newly launched publication. During that time, Joyce also helped launch Eighteen Bridges, a literary magazine with an impressive collection of National Magazine Awards.
In 2014, Joyce moved some 300 kilometers south and became publisher of yet another celebrated magazine: Avenue Calgary. So brilliantly has she led the team of the award-winning lifestyle publication that her role was recently expanded to group publisher.
As a publisher, Joyce favors a collaborative approach.

“While she knows so much about the industry and magazines—from an encyclopedic knowledge of cover concepts published around the world to an up-to-the-minute grasp on the leading ideas about where the industry is going and how to improve sales—she is a great collaborator and listens to ideas and input from all levels of her staff,” affirms Käthe Lemon, editor-in-chief of Avenue Calgary.

“Of all the people I’ve worked for or with, I have rarely if ever had the opportunity to work with anyone more dedicated to the magazine publishing industry or who loves magazines more—indeed, I’m not sure such a person exists,” Lemon adds.
A quick glance at her career illuminates Joyce’s commitment to magazine publishing. Throughout the years, she has worked with magazines ranging in topics from trade, politics and literature to business and city life, and remains as passionate as ever about magazines. In addition to her role as publisher and her various pro bono commitments, Joyce still lends a hand as a proofreader for the semi-annual literary magazine Taddle Creek.

“Volunteering is something we’re all supposed to do, to give something back to our community and our industry,” observes veteran magazine writer David Hayes. “Most of us have the best intentions. Some of us manage one or two commitments around our busy lives. Joyce is a tireless volunteer for countless causes, mostly associated in some way with magazine publishing or writing, in addition to all her paid duties.”

To say that Joyce’s volunteer experience is impressive would be an understatement. She served as a director of Magazines Canada from 2002-2012, where she sat on the public affairs and small magazines committees, curriculum development task forces, and the professional development committee, which she chaired from 2007-2013. In addition, Joyce has served on program development committees for the Ontario Media Development Corporation, on the board of Word on the Street (Toronto)—where she helped develop the successful Canadian Magazines reading tent—and on the board of Edmonton’s Theatre Network. In 2008-2009, Joyce chaired the Advertising Club of Edmonton (ACE) Awards, and from 2010-2014, the Edmonton Cannes Reel Screening fundraiser for National Advertising Benevolent Society (NABS). In 2013, Joyce received the ACE Fellowship Award, and was also named to the NABS Honour Roll the previous year.
Joyce has also served as a director of the National Media Awards Foundation, including a two-year term as president, and still remains involved as a board member. An industry builder, she is currently president of the Alberta Magazine Publishers Association (AMPA) and a director of both the National Advertising Benevolent Society (Western Chapter) and the International Regional Magazine Association (IRMA).
Her efforts are noted and lauded by colleagues.

“I would be hard pressed to find a publishing professional more enthusiastic, engaged and knowledgeable about the magazine media industry than Joyce Byrne. She is a champion of the industry—its people, products and readers,” says Suzanne Trudel, executive director of the Alberta Magazine Publishers Association.

Earlier this year, AMPA recognized Joyce’s publishing expertise by awarding her its Achievement in Publishing Award.
For her dedication and enthusiasm for a stronger and more inclusive Canadian magazine industry, her tireless advocacy for service and volunteerism, and her inspiring leadership in magazine publishing, the National Media Awards Foundation is proud to honour Joyce Byrne, a self-proclaimed “magazine junkie,” with the 2018 Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement.
nmaf_logo_2
NOMINEES – 41st NATIONAL MAGAZINE AWARDS
Finalists for the 41st National Magazine Awards will be announced tomorrow, May 1, 2018 at 10am ET on www.magazine-awards.comblog.magazine-awards.com and on Twitter at @MagAwards. The 41st National Magazine Awards gala is set for June 1, 2018 at the Arcadian Court.  Join us to Celebrate Canadian Creators. Tickets will be on sale on Tuesday, May 1.
 
ABOUT THE OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
The NMAF’s most prestigious individual prize  is the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement, an award that recognizes an individual’s innovation and creativity through contributions to the magazine industry. The award is open to circulation experts, editors, marketing, sales and promotion professionals, publishers, creators, designers, production managers – in short, to everyone in the industry. It cannot be given posthumously.
The Judging Committee of the National Media Awards Foundation considers the nominations, along with nominations from members of the Committee itself. The Board of the National Media Awards Foundation selects the winner. For more information and previous winners, visit magazine-awards.com/oa.
Photo of Joyce Byrne by Jared Sych.

Penny Caldwell's speech at the 40th anniversary National Magazine Awards

Penny Caldwell, publisher of Cottage Life, accepts the 2017 Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement at the 40th anniversary National Magazine Awards gala in Toronto, 26 May 2017 (Photo by Steven Goetz / NMAF)

At last Friday’s 40th anniversary National Magazine Awards gala, the NMAF presented Penny Caldwell, publisher and vice-president of Cottage Life Media, with the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement, the highest individual honour presented in Canadian magazines.
We asked Penny to compose a message to the industry, which was presented in the 40th anniversary NMA gala program and comprised the basis of her acceptance speech at the gala. Here are Penny Caldwell’s complete remarks.


The Space Between

Our urgent need for innovative ideas and talented creators
by Penny Caldwell
I am honoured to receive this award and extend my sincere thanks to the National Magazine Awards Foundation, to my colleagues who nominated me, and to the many people who have contacted me since the news was announced.
Recently, a student at Cottage Life asked me what I have learned over the nearly forty years that I have worked in publishing. The best advice, I told her, was to manage your expectations but keep dreaming, work hard, be patient, and be adaptable.
That advice came to me from Doug Creighton, the founding publisher of the Toronto Sun when, fresh out of university, I was looking for a job. A family friend had arranged the interview, and Doug said he could probably get me a job on the copy desk working the night shift. What a thrill to imagine being part of a big daily newspaper, even as a proofreader on the night shift. Then he advised me not to take the job. Go out, he said, and find a place at a small newspaper where you will learn to do everything. So I went home and applied to every community newspaper across Canada, and I got a job as a sports reporter and columnist at the Whitby News Advertiser in Ajax.
The newspaper’s editor and senior reporters taught me a lot about crafting compelling stories. When one of the girls on the basketball team was fatally attacked by another student, I even covered a murder. But I recall the day I heard some surprising news: that the purpose of the stories we poured our hearts into was to fill the space between the ads.
If only it were that simple.
Fast forward. Most of us here tonight are still inescapably seduced by the power of storytelling. And while we can’t lose sight of the reality that, yes, in our legacy business the stories have traditionally been what fill up the spaces between the ads, we comfort ourselves that good content comes out on top. Content is king. Our readers pay for the content. Our advertisers pay to be close to the content. How close? Well, that’s the million-dollar question, isn’t it?
Ads are no longer simply adjacent to content,. Now they pop up in the middle of the stories—online and on our TV screens. Not that this is new. Who here remembers the issue of Saturday Night magazine in the late ‘90s, in which an excerpt of Mordecai’s Richler’s “Barney’s Version” was typeset to wrap around a vodka bottle? “Absolut Mordecai.”
While the business model for paid advertising evolves, so does our distribution method. Our world now includes an audience that doesn’t expect to have to shell out for content. And so, in an effort to attract the big numbers—not to mention big data—we give away our valuable content for free on our websites, on other digital channels, and in e-newsletters. Our advertising partners, who in the past clamoured to be close to the content, now want to be the content. Our industry has survived the inventions of radio and television, but I don’t know of a time in which magazines have been under more pressure to reinvent themselves—because with new technology we can, and because with new technology we have to. We now compete in more places and in more ways than ever for our customers’ time and money.
My twenty-year-old, idealistic, sports-reporter self says, what has the world come to? My present, practical business self says disruption happens, get on with it. The magazine industry must adapt—all of us here—in order to keep growing. We are going to have to find new sources of revenue, new innovative ways to engage our audiences that they will pay for. And that means learning everything possible about our customers. We’re going to have to find out what’s important to them, and tap into that passion.
My optimistic self says, we can do this. Yes, because we don’t have a choice if we want to survive. But also because as magazine creators we are very, very good at captivating audiences with compelling stories. Magazines are still a highly authentic, trusted platform whose halo has already enabled our industry to expand far beyond print into mega media brands comprising digital, social, video, audio, events, stores, merchandise, and even restaurants. If we continue to tell compelling, relevant stories, in whatever form, the audience will be there and they will pay. We still need good, high-quality content and the talented creators behind it. We still need to recognize its value in our business.
Tonight, we celebrate excellence. Tonight, we celebrate the creators. And tonight, I offer congratulations to those of you—editors, art directors, writers, photographers, illustrators, and publishers—who know how to tell the powerful Canadian stories that have such a profound influence on our society.
Finally, I would like to end with a thank you to Cottage Life, and particularly to Al Zikovitz, my mentor, friend, and long-time boss, who every day teaches me something new about hard work, being adaptable, and chasing your dreams.
Thank you.


Penny Caldwell (@PennyCaldwell) is the publisher and vice-president of Cottage Life Media. At this year’s 40th anniversary National Magazine Awards she was presented with the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement. Read her complete National Magazine Awards bio here
ABOUT THE OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
The NMAF’s most prestigious individual prize  is the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement, an award that recognizes an individual’s innovation and creativity through contributions to the magazine industry.
The award is open to circulation experts, editors, marketing, sales and promotion professionals, publishers, creators, designers, production managers – in short, to everyone in the industry. It cannot be given posthumously. The annual deadline for nominations is March 1.
For more information and previous winners, visit magazine-awards.com/oa.

Penny Caldwell to receive 2017 Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement in Canadian Magazines


The NMAF is proud to present the 2017 Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement to Penny Caldwell, publisher and vice-president of Cottage Life Media.
Penny began her career in magazines as a freelance journalist, writing for sports and boating magazines at a time when it was rare for women to cover those topics. In the summer of 1988, a spirited new publication called Cottage Life debuted, and Penny was tapped to write a feature for the inaugural issue about how to buy a windsurfer.
“There’s no doubt about it,” wrote Penny in the opening lines of her first Cottage Life story, “those hot, lazy days of summer are better at the cottage—and best when you can spend most of your time in and around the water.” She still feels that way.
From her modest start as a freelance writer, Penny began to develop and hone the panoply of journalism and leadership skills that she has come to embody today. In 2000, she was named editor-in-chief of Cottage Life, where she quickly earned a reputation as an editor of considerable passion and frequent praise. In her 15-year tenure as editor, the Canadian Society of Magazine Editors named her its Editor of the Year a record four times, while Cottage Life won Magazine of the Year at the National Magazine Awards in 2003 and again in 2014.

“The hallmarks of Penny’s style are conscientiousness, diplomacy, and kindness. There are never any questions she won’t take the time to answer. No matter how tight the deadline, there is always time to adhere to the tight standards she sets for herself and inspires in her colleagues.”
Cottage Life Media CEO Al Zikovitz

Consistent with the evolving roles of a modern magazine leader, Penny was named brand manager and later vice president of content strategy and development before assuming the mantle of publisher in 2015, succeeding Al Zikovitz. That year, the NMA jury named Cottage Life Canada’s Best Magazine Brand for demonstrating a level of innovation that sets the standard for the industry and represents how a magazine can succeed beyond print with dynamic and thriving extensions.

“As a publisher, Penny has demonstrated her adaptability to changing circumstances and serving readers across multiple platforms. This includes print, digital, television, e-commerce, and live events.”
D.B. Scott, magazine consultant and publisher of Canadian Magazines

Today, Cottage Life reaches over six million Canadians every year as perhaps the savviest magazine brand in the country.
Beyond the walls of Cottage Life’s old cozy HQ at 54 St. Patrick Street in Toronto, Penny has made an indelible mark on the wider magazine industry as a mentor, teacher, volunteer, and advocate for a stronger magazine community. She was a member of the original Magazines Canada task force that developed the industry’s advertising-editorial guidelines, and has sat on the curriculum development committees of MagsU and MagNet.

“Penny’s insights and thoughtful contributions have always put the interest of readers first. Her calm, cool, and collected demeanor informs her success as an editor and publisher.”
Patrick Walsh, editor-in-chief, Outdoor Canada

At Ryerson University’s Magazine and Web Publishing Program she taught students the finer points of building a career in magazines. Many colleagues have noted her interest in learning about new talent in the industry and looking for opportunities to mentor others.

“Penny seeks connections for everyone she meets. She sees that if she fosters this talent within our industry, our collective chances at success—at having healthy, thriving Canadian magazines—are so much greater.”
Jess Ross, multiplatform content director at TVA Publications

All the while, Penny has frequently volunteered her time to sit on panels, juries, and boards of directors (including the NMAF from 2004 to 2010). Currently she serves as president of the International Regional Magazine Association (IRMA), where she has chaired awards committees, led numerous conference sessions, and developed the IRMA Connection initiative to improve communication and learning between members. “Penny is incredibly hard-working and an impressive problem solver who always has time for those who need her help,” says Tara Flint, executive director of IRMA. “She fosters positive discussions and brings out the best in others.”
Last year’s Outstanding Achievement Award winner, Kim Pittaway, sums it up aptly:

“Penny’s career exemplifies the best of what it means to lead a magazine: a deep respect for the audience, a commitment to the highest quality, a desire to innovate, and a dedication to respecting and fostering the talent of those with whom she works.”

For her commendable leadership in every role she has assumed, the NMAF is proud to honour Penny Caldwell with the 40th anniversary Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement. Penny will receive her award and recognition at the 40th anniversary National Magazine Awards gala on May 26 in Toronto.
Tickets go on sale Thursday April 20 at magazine-awards.com.
The nominees for the 40th anniversary National Magazine Awards will be announced on Thursday April 20.
ABOUT THE OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
The NMAF’s most prestigious individual prize  is the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement, an award that recognizes an individual’s innovation and creativity through contributions to the magazine industry.
The award is open to circulation experts, editors, marketing, sales and promotion professionals, publishers, creators, designers, production managers – in short, to everyone in the industry. It cannot be given posthumously.
The Judging Committee of the National Magazine Awards Foundation will consider the nominations, along with nominations from members of the Committee itself. The Board of the National Magazine Awards Foundation will select the winner.
For more information and previous winners, visit magazine-awards.com/oa.
Photo of Penny Caldwell by Daniel Ehrenworth

Michael Fox named the recipient of the 2015 NMAF Outstanding Achievement Award

Michael Fox (photo by Donna Griffith)
Michael Fox (photo by Donna Griffith)

The National Magazine Awards Foundation (NMAF) is pleased to announce that publisher, circulator and magazine industry leader Michael Fox has been named the recipient of the 2015 Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement, sponsored by the Alliance for Audited Media (AAM).
A magazine publisher is many things, perhaps foremost among them a trailblazer. Michael Fox has built a four-decade career as an inspirational leader in the Canadian magazine industry, one which makes the NMAF truly honoured to present him with its Outstanding Achievement Award.

“Michael comes from the behind-the-scenes world of circulation. The Foundation Award is a worthy recognition of this man’s long, unusual, confident contribution to the audience development side of the business. —  D.B. Scott, consultant, editor of Canadian Magazines blog and former recipient of the Foundation Award.

After joining Maclean-Hunter in 1974 as a news editor at the Financial Post, Michael swiftly earned a reputation as an innovator in audience development, one whose remarkably far-sighted vision of the broad, ever-changing landscape of the Canadian consumer market has enabled him to become a recognized leader in circulation. A big-picture thinker, his voice has been one of reason, patience and diplomacy in an era of the magazine industry that demanded nothing less of its champions.
In the early 1980s, he oversaw the computerization of the Maclean-Hunter newsrooms, including Financial Post and Maclean’s, becoming a pioneer in publishing software in the process. Promoted to vice-president of circulation in 1985, he helped take the Financial Post from a weekly to a daily in 1988. After a job move to work on consumer magazines during the growth spurt of Rogers Publishing in the 1990s, Michael established Rogers’ French-language consumer marketing group, and as vice-president of consumer marketing developed valuable partnerships with Airmiles and Aeroplan.

“It is Michael’s commitment to the industry and mentorship which I think is his most outstanding achievement. His commitment to supporting professional development reflects the very best values of the magazine media industry.” — Deborah Morrison, publisher and past chair of Magazines Canada

 
As the industry found itself on the shifting sands of another digital revolution, one that challenged traditional practices of circulation, Michael became the go-to expert on direct marketing and Canada Post, leading the lobbying and advocacy efforts that have been essential to maintaining a healthy environment for Canada’s magazine publishers.
In 2010, Michael and his wife, Beckie, launched Inspiring Media Inc, and began to publish from their hometown of Niagara-on-the-Lake the magazine Garden Making, which has been nominated for two National Magazine Awards. He retired in 2012 as senior vice-president of Rogers Publishing and has served as chair of Magazines Canada for the 2013-2015 term.

“I can’t think of anyone else who has so seamlessly practiced the art of publishing as vocation, avocation, mentor and volunteer.” — Paul Jones, publisher and former recipient of the Foundation Award.

Michael’s passion for magazines has had a multiplying effect, touching an incalculable number of people who’ve worked alongside him and benefited from his determined pursuit of industry excellence. He has served in mentoring and volunteer leadership roles with Circulation Management Association of Canada, Alliance for Audited Media and the Direct Marketing Association of Canada. As an instructor at Magazines Canada’s School for Circulation and Publishing, Michael has helped nurture the continued professional evolution of publishers across Canada, demonstrating with a rare combination of business acumen and infectious generosity what NMAF president Joyce Byrne called “a passionate dedication to the welfare of the industry and the development of our next generation.”
Recognizing Michael Fox’s inestimable value to the Canadian magazine industry, the NMAF is proud to bestow upon him its highest individual honour, the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement.

“Michael is a tireless advocate for Canadian magazines, both big and small. He is an honest broker, a trusted friend, a man of his word. He approaches magazine publishing with a quiet, determined, passionate commitment to excellence.” — Scott Bullock, magazine circulator and editor of CoversSell.com.

Michael Fox will receive the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement at the 38th annual National Magazine Awards gala on June 5, 2015 at the Arcadian Court in Toronto. Tickets go on sale May 4.
Nominees will be announced on Monday, May 4, for awards in 43 written, visual, integrated and special awards for the 38th annual National Magazine Awards.
Tell us what you admire and respect about Michael Fox. Leave a comment on this blog, Twitter, Facebook or email us at staff@magazine-awards.com.
ABOUT THE FOUNDATION AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT
The NMAF’s most prestigious individual prize since its inception in 1990 is The Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement, an award that recognizes an individual’s innovation and creativity through contributions to the magazine industry.
The Judging Committee of the National Magazine Awards Foundation considerS the nominations from the Canadian magazine industry. The NMAF Board of Directors selects the winner.
For more information, visit magazine-awards.com/oa.
 

Call for Nominations: National Magazine Award for Outstanding Achievement


 
The Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement is the highest individual honour bestowed by the National Magazine Awards. [français]
The NMAF is currently accepting nominations from the Canadian magazine industry for this year’s Outstanding Achievement Award. The deadline is March 1, 2015.
The Foundation Award recognizes an individual’s innovation and creativity through contributions to the magazine industry.
The award is open to circulation experts, editors, marketing, sales and promotion professionals, publishers, writers, illustrators, photographers, designers, production managers–in short, to everyone in the industry. It cannot be given posthumously.
Nominations for this award are welcome from everyone in the industry.  The nomination consists of a letter from the nominator indicating the candidate’s name, title and career achievements, with supporting letters from at least two (2) other individuals.
The Judging Committee of the National Magazine Awards Foundation will consider the nominations, along with nominations from members of the Committee itself. The Board of Directors of the National Magazine Awards Foundation will select the winner. No entry fee is required. Applicants not selected will be kept under consideration for two (2) additional years.
Nominations may be submitted via email to staff[at]magazine-awards.com.
Previous winners include Kim Jernigan, Stephen Trumper, Heather Robertson, D.B. Scott, Terry Sellwood, John Macfarlane and more.
For more information visit magazine-awards.com/oa
The deadline for nominations is March 1.